• Q: What is an STI? Is it the same as a Venereal Disease?
  •   A: STI stands for sexually transmitted infection and is usually an infection passed on during sexual intercourse. The term venereal disease (VD) is an out-dated collective term for syphilis and gonorrhoea and has no place in modern medicine.

    Some infections which affect the genitals (vagina or penis) are not sexually transmitted (e.g. thrush and bacterial vaginosis).
  • Q: Is this consultation completely confidential?
  •   A: Yes, no one will be informed of any part of the consultation without your consent. However if we are concerned that you are at great risk of being harmed we may have to share information with colleagues in other departments in your best interests. We will however discuss this with you beforehand and explain why we are concerned about your well being.
  • Q: I have given all my details, will they be passed on to my GP?
  •   A: No, not without your consent.
  • Q: Would I not have symptoms if I had an infection?
  •   A: Many infections do have symptoms but a few serious ones do not. For example, many people infected with chlamydia and gonorrhoea only fi nd out they are infected when other people tell them. Often syphilis, HIV and hepatitis B are only diagnosed by a blood test.
  • Q: What tests will I have and do they hurt?
  •   A: The tests can often be done on a urine sample or a vaginal swab (which you can take yourself). Sometimes we need to take a swab from the urethral in men (hole where urine comes out) or use a speculum to take the samples form the vagina in women. We encourage all patients to have a blood test for HIV and syphilis.
  • Q: How long will it take for the results to come back?
  •   back to the top A: Most results are usually available within 2 weeks, but some special tests may take longer.
  • Q: What infections could I have?
  •   A: Because of the variety of potential sexually transmitted infections, the safest way to investigate is to screen everyone for everything they may be at risk of carrying. It usually becomes clear during the consultation what risks exist and screening will ultimately be dependant on factors that arise in the patientís history. Routinely the conditions screened for are: gonorrhoea, chlamydia, trichomonas, candida, herpes, warts, bacterial vaginosis (in women), non-specifi c urethritis (NSU in men), syphilis and HIV. In some cases it is appropriate to screen for Hepatitis B and C. We will discuss all the tests you are going to have beforehand.
  • Q: Why do some places ask for only urine tests and others for full examination?
  •   A: Not all infections can be detected by doing urine tests only. An extra benefi t of a full examination is that an experienced clinician will be able to recognise and advise on symptoms and conditions that may not have been apparent to the patient. Also depending on your symptoms we may be able to diagnose some infections immediately by looking at the sample down the microscope. This means that in some cases you will be able to get a diagnosis and have treatment before you leave the clinic
  • Q: Would condoms prevent the spread of infection?
  •   A: In short, yes! It is impossible to completely safeguard against transmission of infection but condoms are the safest method after abstinence. Unfortunately, condoms do break quite frequently.
  • Q: If I have a positive result will I have to tell my partner(s)?
  •   back to the top A: No, but we encourage that you do so. Alternatively we can help you contact your partner(s) anonymously on your behalf. We have a team of Professional Health Advisors who can help in this aspect.
  • Q: Will there be any follow-up
  •   A: Our aim is to diagnose and provide relevant treatment. Sometimes a follow-up visit may be required this will be discussed with you before you leave the clinic.
  • Q: Where do I get my medicines from and is there a charge for these?
  •   A: All the medicines you will need for the short term treatment of your symptoms. You will not need to take a prescription to your GP or a pharmacist. Our commitment is to provide a comprehensive and discreet service that encompasses the full diagnosis and treatment package. In most cases you will be given the medication during the consultation. In some cases you will have to go to the hospital pharmacy. You will not have to pay for the medication.
  • Q: What happens when I come to clinic?
  •   A: Initially you will be greeted by the clinic receptionist. You will then see a doctor or a nurse. A detailed clinical history will be taken followed by an appropriate examination with swabs and/or blood tests. We aim to see and provide relevant treatment within your allocated appointment.